Featured Stories tagged with "tourocom"

Total Results: 193
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Why Medicine "Medicine gives me the opportunity to be a leader and an agent of change. I did advocacy work as an undergrad and while getting my Masters of Public Health. Towards the last couple of years, I worked with survivors of sexual violence and women who didn’t feel safe on campus and in their communities. Through medicine there’s a greater ability to create change. I feel, that as a doctor, you are able to provide people with a platform to voice their opinions."
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For the two American doctors, their Haitian counterparts and Touro College of Medicine (TouroCOM) Harlem medical student Maxwell Horowitz, there was little they could do for the suffering woman. The cancer in her abdomen had metastasized with physical properties, emerging as a white mass out of her stomach.
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Why Medicine "I never had any interest in medicine growing up or even in my undergraduate career. After my undergraduate degree, I moved to New York City to pursue a career as a dancer and an actor. After a few years, I got really sick. I was undiagnosed for about six months with an auto-immune disease. Having this experience of being sick without insurance made me think about studying medicine. I felt like there was this whole world of people who are suffering and getting lost in the system. I felt that because of my experiences, I could really offer them something."
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Ashley Adamo graduated from Hunter College with a degree in literature (favorite author: John Irving), before returning for a postbac in bio-chemistry. She found an unlikely link between her two passions: “All medicine is language,” she said. “Reading a medical textbook is like reading James Joyce’s Ulysses. You read it and then later you understand it.” Part of her desire to attend medical school came from her reflecting on her mother’s death when Adamo was a teenager. “My mother died of cancer and doctors were both the heroes and the villains,” Adamo recalled. “I was angry for a while and then I realized that they were the main players and I was on the side and I never wanted to be on the side again.” Plus, she added with a laugh, being a doctor is good in case of a zombie apocalypse. Between finishing her postbac she worked at a lab studying the effect of various cancers on fruit flies.
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Faye Hisoler, whose family hails from the Philippines, said she was attracted to the medical field because of her aunt’s reluctance to see doctors. Hisoler’s aunt passed away from late stage breast cancer that might have been curable had it been diagnosed earlier. After graduating from the College of the Holy Cross, she pursued a Master’s in Public Health at Boston University focusing on epidemiology. “I wanted a broader knowledge of healthcare,” she said. After finishing her Master’s, she decided to apply to medical school. “I realized I couldn’t have a desk job,” said Hisoler. “I wanted to see patients.”
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Both of Jack Zhang’s parents are doctors in China and he chose to follow in their footsteps. They encouraged him to broaden his horizons and think about American medical school. He said that his father, a gynecologist, inspired him. “He would do ten surgeries a day; he was literally saving lives each day,” said Zhang. He said he was looking forward to TouroCOM’s flipped-classrooms. “Touro was my first choice,” he said. 
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On July 1 our 2013 Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine graduates, newly minted doctors, entered the halls of the halls of the hospitals where they are interning. They\'re already making a difference.  Here\'s one difference Dr. Karen Schugt\'s, TouroCOM Class of 2013, has made.
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On April 20th TouroCOM hosted its Spring Health Fair. Residents of Harlem and beyond came for a free-of-charge blood pressure, HIV and diabetes testing. The event was well received, and approximately 150 people attended. 
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Nonprofit national civic organization One Hundred Black Men (OHBM) recently presented a $2,500 contribution to Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM)’s scholarship fund for Underrepresented Minority Students.
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First-year students at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) Harlem campus, and future doctors, ended their first semester orientation last week with a water fight and barbecue. Over hotdogs and hamburgers, students discussed why they chose medicine and what attracted them to TouroCOM’s Harlem campus.