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Featured Stories tagged with "tourocom"

Total Results: 175
Featured Stories
The story begins with Edward Qian, OMS2, who’s been gardening since he was a kid. In his hometown of Hinsdale, a quiet suburb of Chicago, his father (a former carpenter who taught him “to build everything from scratch”) maintained a bountiful garden with cucumbers, tomatoes, and soybeans. 
Featured Stories
On Monday, May 16th, the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM)-Harlem Class of 2018 celebrated their White Coat Ceremony, marking the students’ transition from their preclinical to clinical medical training at the end of their second year of study. The event drew parents, Touro faculty and deans, community members and friends, to the New York Academy of Medicine.
Featured Stories
Fourteen students from Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) Middletown spent a week learning first-hand about the health challenges of developing nations while visiting Nicaragua in June. 
Featured Stories
For the two American doctors, their Haitian counterparts and Touro College of Medicine (TouroCOM) Harlem medical student Maxwell Horowitz, there was little they could do for the suffering woman. The cancer in her abdomen had metastasized with physical properties, emerging as a white mass out of her stomach.
Featured Stories
Why Medicine "Medicine gives me the opportunity to be a leader and an agent of change. I did advocacy work as an undergrad and while getting my Masters of Public Health. Towards the last couple of years, I worked with survivors of sexual violence and women who didn’t feel safe on campus and in their communities. Through medicine there’s a greater ability to create change. I feel, that as a doctor, you are able to provide people with a platform to voice their opinions."
Featured Stories
Michael Erickson is an ardent advocate of the osteopathic profession. In 2013-2014 he was named National Student D.O. of the Year, and during his year as president of TouroCOM\'s Student Government, he also served as National Medical Education Representative of COSGP (College of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents), where he advocated for the need to have “a better, more streamlined process for teaching osteopathic manipulation in medical school.”
Featured Stories
Why Medicine "I never had any interest in medicine growing up or even in my undergraduate career. After my undergraduate degree, I moved to New York City to pursue a career as a dancer and an actor. After a few years, I got really sick. I was undiagnosed for about six months with an auto-immune disease. Having this experience of being sick without insurance made me think about studying medicine. I felt like there was this whole world of people who are suffering and getting lost in the system. I felt that because of my experiences, I could really offer them something."
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Why Medicine "I was part of an anonymous peer hotline in college and it was my first experience helping other people. After that, I knew I wanted to go into medicine."
Featured Stories
On July 1 our 2013 Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine graduates, newly minted doctors, entered the halls of the halls of the hospitals where they are interning. They\'re already making a difference.  Here\'s one difference Dr. Karen Schugt\'s, TouroCOM Class of 2013, has made.
Featured Stories
In June 2014, Jeffrey Karpen came over from the West Coast—where he’d studied, researched and taught for nearly three decades—and joined the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine as its Associate Chair of Basic Biomedical Sciences and Associate Course Director of Physiology, in addition to conducting classes as a Professor of Physiology. His full-time transition to teaching and administration comes on the heels of countless papers and publications dedicated to better understanding and exploiting cell signaling, i.e. how our cells process and interact with their environment—or, at times, fail to—and dictate our basic sensory and biological function.