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Featured Stories tagged with "class of 2021"

Total Results: 16
Featured Stories
Roxana Mehran always knew she was interested in medicine, but her desire crystalized while she worked as an EMT as an undergraduate student at Stonybrook University. “I loved the fast-paced aspect of being an EMT, but it also made me want to know more about the science of what we were doing.” One lesson from her time as an EMT that she plans on applying to medical school? “You never think you’re ready, you just jump into it,” she explained. Roxana is thinking about a career as a pediatrician, though she might specialize.
Featured Stories
Jesse McIlwaine said that he had two loves: baseball and science. After a successful high school career as a closer, McIlwaine dreamt about being a MLB pitcher. When that career didn’t seem possible, McIlwaine recalled a particularly inspiring ninth grade biology teacher and decided to choose medicine. “Medicine seemed like the best medium to allow me to help people,” McIlwaine said. While he didn’t end up in the Majors, McIlwane said that the training he has from baseball will be of use in his medical career. “Being a physician means working as part of a group. It’s very similar to being on a team—you need teamwork.”
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Kriege can trace his love of science back to a single teacher, Mrs. Brenda Kuphall. “Her passion for science inspired me,” he said. As an undergraduate he worked at the Visible Heart Lab at the University of Minnesota where he worked at reanimating human and swine hearts. “Hearts are quite slippery,” he said, adding that a beating hart is incredibly strong and powerful. Kriege spent his gap year working in research and development at AtriCure, a surgical ablation company. He has several patents pending and plans on either becoming an orthopedic surgeon or a cardiothoracic surgeon.
Featured Stories
On July 24, the 135 members of TouroCOM Middletown’s class of 2021 donned their white coats and began their medical school career. We spoke with several members of the new class about their backgrounds, their journey to medical school and why they chose to join the TouroCOM family.
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Ashley Adamo graduated from Hunter College with a degree in literature (favorite author: John Irving), before returning for a postbac in bio-chemistry. She found an unlikely link between her two passions: “All medicine is language,” she said. “Reading a medical textbook is like reading James Joyce’s Ulysses. You read it and then later you understand it.” Part of her desire to attend medical school came from her reflecting on her mother’s death when Adamo was a teenager. “My mother died of cancer and doctors were both the heroes and the villains,” Adamo recalled. “I was angry for a while and then I realized that they were the main players and I was on the side and I never wanted to be on the side again.” Plus, she added with a laugh, being a doctor is good in case of a zombie apocalypse. Between finishing her postbac she worked at a lab studying the effect of various cancers on fruit flies.
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Faye Hisoler, whose family hails from the Philippines, said she was attracted to the medical field because of her aunt’s reluctance to see doctors. Hisoler’s aunt passed away from late stage breast cancer that might have been curable had it been diagnosed earlier. After graduating from the College of the Holy Cross, she pursued a Master’s in Public Health at Boston University focusing on epidemiology. “I wanted a broader knowledge of healthcare,” she said. After finishing her Master’s, she decided to apply to medical school. “I realized I couldn’t have a desk job,” said Hisoler. “I wanted to see patients.”
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Both of Jack Zhang’s parents are doctors in China and he chose to follow in their footsteps. They encouraged him to broaden his horizons and think about American medical school. He said that his father, a gynecologist, inspired him. “He would do ten surgeries a day; he was literally saving lives each day,” said Zhang. He said he was looking forward to TouroCOM’s flipped-classrooms. “Touro was my first choice,” he said. 
Featured Stories
Students hailing from both the tri-state area and considerably further celebrated their entrance to TouroCOM with a week-long orientation program concluding with a barbecue and a block party in Harlem. While the festivities were cut short by a rainstorm, students were happy to discuss their plans and their backgrounds. Students spoke about their desire to have a positive impact on the world and shared a fun fact about themselves.
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Robin Frake said she had an epiphany during a PR class. One group of students was assigned the task of creating an advertising campaign for a hospital after a disaster. “I realized I didn’t want to be on the business side of this or advancing a corporate interest,” recalled Frake. “I wanted to be out there helping people.”  She spent her gap year working as a medical scribe at a local hospital and called the day when she found out she was accepted to TouroCOM, the “greatest moment of my life.”
Featured Stories
After graduating from UBC, Israel-born Daniela Ben Neriah opted to broaden her medical knowledge by pursuing a master’s in nutrition from Columbia University.