High school students learn how to become first responders

March 29, 2018
Approximately 50 high school students in Med-Achieve learned how to help patients with life-threatening injuries survive a simulated train wreck.
Approximately 50 high school students in Med-Achieve learned how to help patients with life-threatening injuries survive a simulated train wreck.

Against the backdrop of sirens blaring from a YouTube video showing emergency vehicles stuck in a New York City traffic jam, approximately 50 high school students in an after school program at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine last week learned how to help patients with life-threatening injuries survive a simulated train wreck.

At Trauma Day, their medical student mentors, adorned with fake blood and lying down impaled with foreign objects to mimic real-life injuries—such as lacerations, broken bones, burns, dislocations and fractures—role-played victims as they guided their mentees through preliminary evaluations done in emergency medicine to locate and manage injuries and determine who gets care first.

“The purpose was to give the students practice on how to handle, as first responders, any traumatic emergency,” explained David Colbourne, M.D., assistant clinical professor at TouroCOM and director of medical simulation, who planned and oversaw the instruction. “Once given the information, they then were able to test what they had learned in a hands-on setting. They all performed very well.”

The Med-Achieve Scholars Program

The students are part of a highly successful enrichment program called the Med-Achieve Scholars Program, begun in 2012, for underrepresented minority high school students who are interested in careers in medicine or health-related fields. Currently more than 50 students are enrolled, mainly from Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics and A. Philip Randolph High School in Harlem. Other schools represented are Bard High School Early College in the East Village, Stuyvesant High School in Tribeca and Bronx High School of Science.

Source: Amsterdam News