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TouroCOM Hosts Trauma Day

April 05, 2018

About 50 high school students enrolled in Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM)’s highly successful after-school program, Med-Achieve, with their TouroCOM student mentors following their final session for the semester, "Trauma Day".  At "Trauma Day" the TouroCOM student mentors, adorned with fake blood and lying impaled with foreign objects to mimic real injuries, helped show the aspiring physicians how to become first responders and help "patients" with life-threatening injuries survive a simulated train wreck. Among the injuries were lacerations, broken bones, severe burns, dislocations, and fractures. The students were taught how to check breathing, pulse, circulation, and cervical spines for damage.

High school students learn how to become first responders

March 29, 2018

Against the backdrop of sirens blaring from a YouTube video showing emergency vehicles stuck in a New York City traffic jam, approximately 50 high school students in an after school program at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine last week learned how to help patients with life-threatening injuries survive a simulated train wreck.

At Trauma Day, their medical student mentors, adorned with fake blood and lying down impaled with foreign objects to mimic real-life injuries—such as lacerations, broken bones, burns, dislocations and fractures—role-played victims as they guided their mentees through preliminary evaluations done in emergency medicine to locate and manage injuries and determine who gets care first.

“The purpose was to give the students practice on how to handle, as first responders, any traumatic emergency,” explained David Colbourne, M.D., assistant clinical professor at TouroCOM and director of medical simulation, who planned and oversaw the instruction. “Once given the information, they then were able to test what they had learned in a hands-on setting. They all performed very well.”

The Med-Achieve Scholars Program

The students are part of a highly successful enrichment program called the Med-Achieve Scholars Program, begun in 2012, for underrepresented minority high school students who are interested in careers in medicine or health-related fields. Currently more than 50 students are enrolled, mainly from Manhattan Center for Science and Mathematics and A. Philip Randolph High School in Harlem. Other schools represented are Bard High School Early College in the East Village, Stuyvesant High School in Tribeca and Bronx High School of Science.

"Trauma Day” At Touro College Of Osteopathic Medicine From Harlem To Hollis

March 26, 2018

Against the backdrop of sirens blaring from a YouTube video showing emergency vehicles stuck in a New York City traffic jam, about 50 high school students in an after school program at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine.

At “Trauma Day” their medical student mentors, adorned with fake blood and lying down impaled with foreign objects to mimic real life injuries – such as lacerations, broken bones, burns, dislocations and fractures — role-played “patients” as they guided their mentees through preliminary evaluations done in emergency medicine to locate and manage injuries and determine who gets care first.

“The purpose was to give the students practice on how to handle, as first responders, any traumatic emergency,” explained David Colbourne, M.D., assistant clinical professor at TouroCOM and director of medical simulation, who planned and oversaw the instruction. “Once given the information they then were able to test what they had learned in a hands-on setting. They all performed very well.”

Is there a doctor in the house? Increased diversity measures are promoting more opportunities for minorities

March 07, 2018

As the #OscarsSoWhite social media outcry made Hollywood listen to the call for racial inclusion (cue inclusion rider speech, please) the world of medicine has been rallying its own cry for diversity.

In fact, some osteopathic medical schools have made diversity their mission.

According to a report by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the number of black males in medical school in 2014 was 515, which is 27 less than the number of black male students enrolled in medical school  in 1978. The reasons for the decline are myriad and complex, which prompted some colleges of osteopathic medicine to take action.

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM-Harlem) in New York City offers Med-Achieve, a two-year mini-medical school for freshman and sophomore minority high school students, taught by current TouroCOM medical students.

At the next level, between college and medical school, TouroCOM-Harlem offers a one-year pipeline MS to DO program. “The Master of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences degree provides high-achieving students that fall slightly short of the required MCAT score with an additional year of preparation, and the opportunity to apply to our DO program,” says Nadege Dady, EdD, dean of student affairs at TouroCOM-Harlem. “It’s a cornerstone of our school and how we’re meeting our mission.”

Florida School Shooting: What do we tell our kids?

February 16, 2018

The gunman who opened fire at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, wiped out lives and left friends and family struggling to cope after the United States’ latest mass shooting.

Dr. Jeffrey Gardere, a widely sought-after experts in the field of mental health, joined PIX11 News Friday night to teach parents and families how to talk to children about difficult news.

In addition to having a private practice in Manhattan, Gardere is an Assistant Professor and Course Director of Behavioral Medicine at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York City. Also known as “America’s Psychologist”, is also a prolific author of four books and a contributing author of a half-dozen books including the brand-new text, “The Causes of Autism.”

How parents can explain this trauma to kids:

• Ask them what they know and what questions or discussion they may want to have.
• Ask them how they feel about the shooting and if they have any idea what the kids at the school may be going through.
• Ask them to express any thoughts they may have about the kids who were injured or killed.
• Ask them about their own school and if they know any kids like the shooter and their thoughts on that. As well, how they may want to help that person with a mental health issue. Or if they have any dears about their own school.
• If you don’t have an answer for a question and concern, let them know you don’t know…it’s oaky…you can both figure it out in time.

3 reasons why you might feel ill when you take supplements

January 19, 2018

It’s an unfortunately familiar sensation. You swig down your daily vitamin supplements with a glass of water (or, let’s be honest, a gulp of your morning coffee), and by the time you get to the office, you’re fighting waves of nausea.

It can be disheartening to make an effort to take care of your health, only to have it backfire. You may even be tempted to give up on supplements altogether, but let’s be real – in the modern grab-and-go world, vitamins are vital for topping up any deficiencies we might be experiencing.

It’s important to note supplements are still no substitute for a balanced diet, and your iron tablet can’t hold a candle to a plate of steamed greens, but they’re a great way to give ourselves a little boost, so here’s three things you can avoid doing to ditch that post-nutrient nausea.

1. You’re not taking the right kind of supplements for your body
Everyone has different supplementary needs, and it could be that your supposedly universal multivitamin isn’t actually doing you a whole lot of good.

Being on numerous supplements means you’re at risk of actually overdosing on a certain vitamin or mineral. For example, if your diet is already very high in iron,an additional supplement might actually push you over the necessary threshold. Excess iron can lead to nausea, stomach cramps and diarrhoea.

If you’re experiencing any unpleasant side-effects from your supplement routine, consult with your GP. They’ll be able to assess your diet and lifestyle and suggest what to take accordingly, and may even do a quick blood test to check for any serious deficiencies.

2. You’re taking too many fat-soluble vitamins
The most common fat-soluble vitamins we encounter are A, D, E and K. While excesses of non-fat-soluble vitamins leave the body via our urine, fat-soluble vitamins leave deposits in the body. Over time these can build up and cause significant discomfort, or even damage.

Nausea from A, D, E and K overdoses may not pass for several hours, even if you have something to eat. As well as a stomach upset, you can experience a headache, itching and even bone pain.

Niket Sonpal, M.D., assistant clinical professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York, advises that we be careful when taking fat-solubles. “If you notice you’re having chronic nausea see your doctor and back off those vitamins immediately because that can be dangerous,” he says.

3. You’re taking your vitamins on an empty stomach
Regardless of the format – gummy, coated, capsule – or type, a supplement will cause irritation to the stomach if it’s the only thing in there. The nausea can linger for two or three hours, until the vitamins pass through into the intestines.

AAMS Scholarships Awarded During Annual Mentorship Night

January 11, 2018

The Armenian American Medical Society (AAMS) held its Annual Mentorship Program on December 27, 2017. The Mentorship program is an AAMS project that unites healthcare partners with burgeoning medical professionals who are looking towards a future in the field of healthcare. 

Each year, the Armenian American Medical Society also awards scholarships to qualified Armenian students enrolled in various healthcare education programs in the fields of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing and allied health. 

Lina Acopians a third year medical student at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown was one of the scholarship recipients.

 

Touro at Ten

December 13, 2017

It has been a decade of doing.

Harlem community leaders and Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) founders and their supporters celebrated at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture this past Wed., Dec. 6th to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the school’s Harlem opening and their joint efforts in educating underrepresented minorities (URMs).

Touro College Honors Founders And TouroCOM-Harlem Community Board

December 12, 2017

Harlem community leaders and Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) founders and their supporters packed the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem Wednesday night to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the school’s opening in Harlem and their joint efforts in educating.All proceeds from the Gala will go towards funding additional scholarships for URMs.

To rousing applause, Dr. Hazel Dukes, president of the NAACP New York State Conference, who is both a founder of the TouroCOM-Harlem Community Advisory Board (CAB) and was honored at the event, renewed the CAB’s commitment made ten years ago to help TouroCOM educate minority doctors and address health disparities by serving the underserved.

“I decided that I would be a voice for Touro and tonight, 10 years later, I’m still committed to make sure that…our board will continue the same legacy,” Dr. Dukes said. “Health is wealth and we are committed to making sure that everyone receives quality health care and Touro is on the road to making that happen. They are committed and we renew our commitment.”

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine to Hold Gala

December 06, 2017

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM) is holding a Tenth Anniversary Gala on December 6, 2017 at 6:30 p.m. at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem. The Gala is celebrating the building of the school and the contributions of its founders, who opened it in 2007 with a mission to educate underrepresented minorities (URMs) and serve the underserved. The festive occasion will honor TouroCOM’s founders and founding members of its Community Advisory Board (CAB). The CAB has provided guidance to the school and served as a liaison between the Harlem community and the College to help TouroCOM meet its goals. Among its key accomplishments are the establishment of a scholarship fund, which has raised more than $170,000 and resulted in 15 student scholarships. All proceeds from the Gala will benefit the TouroCOM Underrepresented Minority Fund, to give these students the opportunity for a medical school education.

Dr. Hazel Dukes, President of the NAACP New York State Conference, is among the founding CAB members to be honored. A Harlem resident who chaired the local Community Board when the school was founded, Dr. Dukes was well aware of the health disparities in the community and the need for a successful medical school in Harlem to address them.

4 Ways To Train Your Brain To Be More Open-Minded

November 14, 2017

The idea that opposites attract isn’t entirely true. People prefer to hang out with people who are like-minded, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. While this makes for easy-going relationships and conversations, it doesn’t help to broaden your perspective or open your mind. To do those things, you have to purposefully take other actions.

“Becoming more open-minded is actually a counterintuitive mental task,” says John Brown, psychologist and organizational development consultant for EPIC Insurance Brokers & Consultants. “Our brains think in whole ideas, the famous cognitive psychologist Jean Piaget taught us. These whole ideas are called ‘schema.'”

Schema includes our life experiences, beliefs, social reinforcements, and physiological reactions. “To visualize schema, think of Venn diagrams,” he explains. “When new information comes into our consciousness, we have to either fit it to our existing schema, or adjust our existing schema to fit the new information.”

When something fits, it’s called “assimilation,” says Brown. “Assimilation is easy, because the new information fits all of our other existing experiences and preconceived ideas; it doesn’t challenge any existing ideas,” he says. “But when new information doesn’t fit into our existing ideas about things, the new information might challenge your feelings, your beliefs, and your own past experiences.”

Piaget called this phenomenon “accommodation.” “Accommodation requires the mental, or cognitive, ability to suspend judgment temporarily, to weigh information, and a willingness to recognize parts of your own existing beliefs as incorrect or in need of new frames of reference,” says Brown. “People become very defensive when their existing ideas are challenged. When we can’t wrap our heads around a new idea, that’s an example of how hard it is to accommodate.”

Medical students and Horizon Medical with cancer survivor ‘Turn the Town Teal’

September 20, 2017

Warwick – Local ovarian cancer survivor Kathy Colquhoun and 23 Horizon Family Medical Group/Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine students “turned the town teal”® on Aug. 31 to raise awareness of ovarian cancer.

The Ultimate Guide To Managing Your Cholesterol

September 18, 2017

Yes, you’ve heard of cholesterol and understand the importance of keeping it in check—but as for the nitty gritty of how to do so, that’s where things may start to get fuzzy.

Don’t worry, you’re not alone: An April 2017 survey by the American Heart Association (AHA) found that most people who have high cholesterol aren’t sure how to manage their condition and don’t feel confident that they can. And 47% of the respondents with a history of or risk factors for heart disease or stroke hadn't gotten their cholesterol checked in over a year.

“With all the conflicting data among the scientific community about cholesterol, it’s hard for patients to know exactly what their cholesterol level should be and what to do to get it there,” says Jennifer Haythe, MD, leading cardiologist and internist at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York.

Since even modestly elevated cholesterol levels can lead to heart disease later in life, here’s everything you need to know (and do) to get a grip on your cholesterol:

Cholesterol tends to get a bad rap.

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that’s found in every cell of the body, and plays an important role in many bodily functions, such as making hormones, vitamin D, and substances that help you digest foods, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. It travels through your bloodstream in tiny packets called lipoproteins, which are made of fat on the inside and proteins on the outside.

There are two types of lipoproteins that deliver cholesterol throughout your body—low-density (LDL) and high-density (HDL)—and having healthy levels of both is super-important to your overall health.

LDL cholesterol (Bad): Your body uses LDL lipoproteins to build cells—but when you have too much it becomes a “bad” cholesterol, building up in the walls of your arteries and causing them to narrow, says Niket Sonpal, MD, assistant professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York.

HDL cholesterol (Good): Known as “good” cholesterol, HDL lipoproteins protect against heart disease by sending “bad” cholesterol to your liver, where it’s processed and removed from your body.

On its own, high blood cholesterol doesn’t cause any symptoms, hence the importance of finding out what your numbers are. The higher the level of LDL cholesterol in your blood, the higher your risk of heart disease. The higher the level of HDL cholesterol, the lower your risk.

Turning Warwick Teal

September 06, 2017

 — Local ovarian cancer survivor Kathy Colquhoun and 23 Horizon Family Medical Group/Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine students “turned the town teal” on Thursday, Aug. 31, to raise awareness of ovarian cancer. 

Horses stand in as ‘patients’ to help local med students boost their bedside skills

September 03, 2017

TOWN OF WARWICK - Horses have their own way of talking back.

They can be stubborn, uncooperative or dismissive, just like people.

That’s why they are the perfect patient substitutes for first-year students at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown who are learning about bedside manner, according to Deirdre Hamling.

Orange County medical college uses unique teaching program

August 25, 2017

Touro is one of a handful of medical schools nationwide offering the Medicine and Horsemanship program.

Payal Aggarwal

August 02, 2017

Payal Aggarwal was born and raised in Queens. She attended Bronx High School of Science and pursued an undergraduate degree in economics and chemistry at New York University. During her time at NYU, Aggarwal was a resident hall assistant and actively involved in the community service organization, NYU Alternative Breaks. She went on week-long service trips every year of college and helped train leaders of these trips as well. She enrolled in the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine and pursued her doctorate there. She was elected as the Student Body Vice President and represented the school nationally at AACOM’s Council of Osteopathic Government Presidents. She was then elected to the E-board of COSGP and served as the organization’s Global Health Representative advocating on behalf of 26,000 osteopathic medical students nationally and internationally.

Payal recently graduated medical school, is starting her pediatrics residency at the Brooklyn Hospital Center, and hopes to pursue pediatric oncology as her specialty in the future.

U.S. Faces Looming Shortage Of Primary Care Physicians

August 02, 2017

America will soon face a shortage of as many as 90,000 doctors.

CBS2’s Dr. Max Gomez reports a combination of retiring doctors and increasing demand will lead to a significant need for primary care physicians. But some medical schools are working to ease the problem.

Dr. Katelyn Norman just started her internal medicine residency at Waterbury Hospital in Connecticut. It’s one of the final steps to achieving her lifelong dream of becoming a doctor.

“The work you do has such consequences for people and their lives and their health,” she said.

The U.S. is in need of more primary care doctors, partly because many older physicians are retiring, citing increased paperwork and decreased time with patients.

Norman is part of the first graduating class at Quinnipiac University’s new medical school that is tackling the shortage in internal medicine, OBGYN, pediatrics and psychiatry.

Other medical schools like the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine are also prioritizing primary care applicants.

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine Awards Physician Payal Aggarwal with Top Honor

July 24, 2017

The Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine announced July 11 that Payal Aggarwal was honored in recognition for her service, leadership, research and dedication.

The Indian American physician, who graduated with a doctor of osteopathic medicine, or DO, degree from the college last month and recently began her residency at Brooklyn Hospital’s pediatrics division, grew up wanting to become a doctor after seeing her grandfather in India suffering from cancer.

When she turned 10, she began volunteering for the American Cancer Society, according to a Touro COM news release.

Now, working in pediatrics, she said in the news release she is “thrilled” and “can’t wait to see what the future has in store.”

Aggarwal hopes to pursue pediatric oncology, which she aspired to after volunteering at a camp for kids diagnosed with cancer, Camp Happy Days, an experience that she wrote about in The DO magazine, according to the Touro release.

Aggarwal’s contributions have been so substantial, along with her achievements, that the college of medicine recognized her with its highest honor, ‘Student DO of the Year’.

Queens Resident Receives Award From Touro College

July 19, 2017

When Dr. Payal Aggarwal, DO, was just six years old, she visited her grandfather in India in the hospital. He had cancer and she told him the experience of their visits made her want to become a doctor when she grew up. “He said nothing would make him happier,” Aggarwal recalled in a recent interview.

She began volunteering at age 10 for the American Cancer Society. Fast forward to last month, when her dream became reality – she donned a cap and gown at the Apollo Theater in Harlem and joined the graduating class of Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (TouroCOM). Last Saturday she began her residency at Brooklyn Hospital in pediatrics.

“I hope to pursue pediatric oncology, so I was thrilled to match into pediatrics! I can’t wait to see what the future has in store,” she said.

Pediatric oncology entered the picture for Aggarwal after volunteering at a camp for children diagnosed with cancer, Camp Happy Days, an experience that she wrote about in The DO magazine.

The camp would be one on a long list of challenging volunteer experiences the young doctor would take on during her journey to earning her doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) degree.

Dr. Aggarwal’s contributions were so numerous and achievements so exceptional that TouroCOM awarded her its highest honor at commencement, “Student DO of the Year,” for her outstanding service to the school, her leadership, research and dedication to the profession.

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