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This Is What Alkaline Water Really Does to Your Body

September 21, 2018

Alkaline water is having a moment—but is it really worth the extra money? Here's what experts have to say about this beverage trend.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1958 stabbing recalled 60 years later at emotional Harlem event

September 21, 2018

Among the many roles Harlem played in the rich history of America was saving the life of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. in 1958, when the minister was stabbed in an uptown department store.

Before he won a Nobel Peace Prize or helped secure voting and civil rights for African-Americans, or outlined his dream for a multicultural society, or condemned the war in Vietnam or marched for striking sanitation workers, King, just 29, was nearly killed by a “demented” black woman — Izola Curry, who plunged a letter opener in his chest while he was signing copies of a book he had written about the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott.

MLK remembered on anniversary of Harlem stabbing that nearly killed him and the movement a decade before he was assassinated

September 19, 2018

It’s a progressive medical school now, doing innovative research on dementia and immunology, but the spot where Harlem’s Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine stands was once home to a bustling department store where a movement almost died.

It happened that fast, in the time it takes to click a ballpoint pen. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was signing copies of his first book, “Stride Toward Freedom: The Montgomery Story,” on 125th St., in what was then Blumstein’s department store. It was there that a mentally ill black woman, Izola Curry, stepped up to his table and plunged a 7-inch, ivory-handled steel letter opener into the minister’s chest.

7 Questions You Should Ask Your Mom About Her Health ASAP

September 13, 2018

Your family's health history can offer clues into your own well-being. 

When it comes to assessing your risk for a variety of health conditions and diseases, your parents can provide a wealth of information that can help doctors to treat you correctly. This is especially true for your mom and her side of the family tree.

Not all health problems have a genetic component, but understanding more about your maternal health history can help you to understand your own body better and make predictions for the future. But first, you need to ask the right questions.

 

7 Things Your Body Is Trying To Tell You When You Have Body Odor

September 10, 2018

Everyone has body odor of some sort. Try as you might to get rid of it, between your sweat and oil glands, you likely have a scent, subtle though it may be. Chances are, you don't even regularly notice it, because you're more than used to the way your body smells after being so up close and personal with it day in and day out, but if your body odor changes (or if you forgo a shower one too many times), you might notice it more. There are some things your body is trying to tell you when you have body odor, however, that might be worth paying attention to.

Will I Get Committed if I Say This to My Therapist?

August 23, 2018

IF YOU TELL YOUR therapist that you hate your boss and are angry enough to kill him or her, could that get you committed to a hospital against your will?

5 Hangover Cures That Actually Work (Plus 4 That Really Don’t)

August 22, 2018

While your memories may be a little fuzzy, the morning after a night of one-too-many cocktails brings into full focus the effect alcohol has on your body. From a headache to nausea, the total exhaustion from drinking too much can even making lying in bed and watching Netflix all day seem too difficult. The desperation can leave you scrambling for hangover cures, no matter how far-fetched.

The problem? A lot of common hangover cures are total myths, according to the experts. We dug into which remedies are BS to get to the bottom of the science-backed hangover cures that will actually make you feel better.

DO cancer survivor develops intrauterine device with help from Bill & Melinda Gates

August 17, 2018

Growing up in Bangladesh, a then-8-year-old Mikail Kamal, DO, was fighting for his life. The diagnosis was leukemia and led to him and his family relocating to Singapore for three years for his treatment. The chemotherapy and the associated pain of the illness wound up turning a young child against the field of medicine with its constant intrusions and supposed solutions.

How to Eat Vegan During Pregnancy

July 23, 2018

Whole grains, nuts and fortified cereals can help expectant moms get the nutrients they need.

8 Myths About Managing Labor Pain

July 16, 2018

Our very own Dr. Zeszutek was quoted in this article on myths about managing labor pains.

First Touro graduates have Goshen and Warwick connections

July 11, 2018

— The 117 medical students who recently received the first doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) degrees awarded by Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown also had affiliations with Horizon Family Medical Group in Goshen.

Touro looks at new curriculum at Middletown campus

July 09, 2018

MIDDLETOWN – The Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine campus in Middletown, which graduated its first class a little over a month ago, is seeking approvals to offer a second curriculum.

Touro medical school in Middletown graduates first class

May 31, 2018

Four years ago, 117 future medical students took a chance with one of their most important decisions in life.

En Harlem preparan a doctores del mañana, muchos son niños latinos

May 29, 2018

Un accidente automovilístico, cuando aún era muy pequeña, le cambió la vida a Shaila Cuellar. Desde ese acontecimiento, ocurrido en 2011, la niña de origen mexicano comenzó a ver las cosas de manera distinta, pero no por las heridas que sufrió, sino por la traumática experiencia de ver cómo doctores y enfermeras trataban de salvarle la vida a ella, a su mamá y su hermano menor en la sala de emergencias.

“El ver a mi mamá tendida en esa cama realmente despertó algo en mí y fue allí cuando decidí que quería dedicar mi vida a ayudar a la gente que es llevada de emergencia al hospital por haber sufrido algún trauma”, dijo la joven de 15 años nacida en Nueva York de padres mexicanos (del estado de Puebla).

“Siempre quise ser una pediatra, porque el ver lo que hizo la doctora por mi hermano y por mí en la sala de emergencias de ese hospital, me hizo entender lo importante que es esa profesión y decidí, desde que estaba pequeña, que eso era lo que quería estudiar”, agregó la menor quien residente en sector del East Harlem en Manhattan, conocido popularmente como “El Barrio”.

Aunque aún le quedan dos años para graduarse de escuela secundaria y seguir una carrera en el campo de la salud, Cuellar tuvo la oportunidad, el año pasado, de participar en un programa universitario que le permitió experimentar en carne propia lo que es ser una estudiante en una escuela de medicina reconocida, algo con lo que siempre ha soñado.

Gracias al programa ‘MedAchive’ del Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, ubicado en Harlem (TouroCOM-Harlmen), jóvenes de secundaria como Cuellar, que están interesados en seguir una carrera universitaria en el campo de la medicina y la ciencia, pueden aprender sobre lo básico de esta profesión, durante un curso extracurricular que toman después de la escuela.

En Harlem preparan a doctores del mañana, muchos son niños latinos

May 29, 2018

Un programa universitario entrena y motiva a estudiantes de secundaria para que sigan carreras en el campo de la medicina y las ciencias.

Un accidente automovilístico, cuando aún era muy pequeña, le cambió la vida a Shaila Cuellar. Desde ese acontecimiento, ocurrido en 2011, la niña de origen mexicano comenzó a ver las cosas de manera distinta, pero no por las heridas que sufrió, sino por la traumática experiencia de ver cómo doctores y enfermeras trataban de salvarle la vida a ella, a su mamá y su hermano menor en la sala de emergencias.

“El ver a mi mamá tendida en esa cama realmente despertó algo en mí y fue allí cuando decidí que quería dedicar mi vida a ayudar a la gente que es llevada de emergencia al hospital por haber sufrido algún trauma”, dijo la joven de 15 años nacida en Nueva York de padres mexicanos (del estado de Puebla).

“Siempre quise ser una pediatra, porque el ver lo que hizo la doctora por mi hermano y por mí en la sala de emergencias de ese hospital, me hizo entender lo importante que es esa profesión y decidí, desde que estaba pequeña, que eso era lo que quería estudiar”, agregó la menor quien residente en sector del East Harlem en Manhattan, conocido popularmente como “El Barrio”.

Aunque aún le quedan dos años para graduarse de escuela secundaria y seguir una carrera en el campo de la salud, Cuellar tuvo la oportunidad, el año pasado, de participar en un programa universitario que le permitió experimentar en carne propia lo que es ser una estudiante en una escuela de medicina reconocida, algo con lo que siempre ha soñado.

Gracias al programa ‘MedAchive’ del Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, ubicado en Harlem (TouroCOM-Harlem), jóvenes de secundaria como Cuellar, que están interesados en seguir una carrera universitaria en el campo de la medicina y la ciencia, pueden aprender sobre lo básico de esta profesión, durante un curso extracurricular que toman después de la escuela.

UAlbany and Touro partner for early admission medical school program

May 22, 2018

SUNY Albany and Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown are creating a new opportunity for future medical school students.

Unsung heroes honored at 5th Annual Queens Impact Awards

May 21, 2018

TimesLedger Newspapers, once again recognized the people in Queens who make a difference behind the scenes.

These are the borough’s unsung heroes who volunteer and work outside the public eye, rescuing vulnerable residents and inspiring youngsters to reach for the gold ring against sometimes formidable odds.

All of our honorees share a remarkable motivation to help others.

At just 28 years old, Payal Aggarwal has dedicated most of her life to volunteer work and medicine.

Aggarwal, who grew up in Kew Gardens, earned her doctor of osteopathic medicine degree from Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2015 and shortly after, began her residency at Brooklyn Hospital in pediatrics, where she plans to become a pediatric oncologist.

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine holds commencement ceremonies

May 17, 2018

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine held commencement ceremonies May 8, 2018, at the Alhambra Ballroom for the Class of 2018 candidates for its Master of Science program in Interdisciplinary Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences. The unique program helps fulfill a key part of the school’s mission to train underrepresented minorities with an emphasis on working in underserved communities.

Keynote speaker Geoffrey Eaton, president, NAACP Mid-Manhattan Branch, and a founding member of TouroCOM-Harlem’s Community Advisory Board, told the students they were “the next level of people who might save my life.” Eaton said, “For the last 10 years we have worked together with amazing faculty and outstanding deans to create more programs to get more people of color to get into schools so they can…become doctors and come back to our communities. I encourage you to come back to the Harlems of this nation to help your communities become healthier. We have a health crisis in this nation that continues to be a challenge for all of us.”

How to Tell If Your Bad Body Odor Is Cause for Concern

May 08, 2018

Even copious amounts of deodorant and a devotion to perfume don't guarantee that you won't stink sometimes. Body odor is a normal occurrence, and when it's not connected to a larger problem, you can attribute it to the mixture of sweat, bacteria, and environmental dirt that accumulates on your skin, Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, tells Allure. "Body odor becomes stronger over time, as more bacteria and sweat build up on the skin, and they interact with each other," he explains. "This is not harmful, as healthy bacteria live symbiotically on our bodies."

TouroCOM Harlem Holds Commencement At The Historic Alhambra In Harlem

May 08, 2018

Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine(TouroCOM) yesterday held commencement ceremonies at the Alhambra Ballroom in Harlem for the Class of 2018 candidates for its Master of Science program in Interdisciplinary Studies in Biological and Physical Sciences.

“For the last ten years we have worked together with amazing faculty and outstanding deans to create more programs to get more people of color to get into schools so they can… become doctors and come back to our communities. I encourage you to come back to the Harlems of this nation– to help your communities become healthier. We have a health crisis in this nation that continues to be a challenge for all of us.”

The unique program helps fulfill a key part of the school’s mission to train underrepresented minorities (URMs) with an emphasis on working in underserved communities. Keynote speaker Geoffrey Eaton, president, NAACP Mid-Manhattan Branch and a founding member of TouroCOM-Harlem’s Community Advisory Board, told the students they were “the next level of people who might save my life.” Said Mr. Eaton: “For the last ten years we have worked together with amazing faculty and outstanding deans to create more programs to get more people of color to get into schools so they can… become doctors and come back to our communities. I encourage you to come back to the Harlem’s of this nation– to help your communities become healthier. We have a health crisis in this nation that continues to be a challenge for all of us.”

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