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Luis Vidal, PhD

Assistant Professor, Neuroanatomy Course Director, Department of Anatomy

  • Office: 230 West 125th Street, Suite 423
  • Campus:
    Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine - Harlem
  • Phone:
    (646) 981-4607
  • Email:
    luis.vidal@touro.edu

Education/Training

1997 - University of Puerto Rico, Cayey University College, BS Biology.
2003 - University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus, Dept. of Anatomy, and Neurobiology, Ph.D. Anatomy.
2006 – Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY, Dept. of Psychiatry, Postdoc associate.
2010 – CUNY, City College of New York, Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology, Postdoc associate.

Courses Taught

- Histology
- Neuroscience

Areas of Research

The focus of my graduate and first postdoctoral projects consisted of analyzing the rodent circadian system at the anatomical, molecular biology and behavioral level. During my second postdoctoral fellowship I used my behavioral research expertise to set up a behavioral research program at the Dept. of Physiology and Pharmacology at CUNY, City College of New York to investigate the rewarding effects of cocaine and various approaches to minimize those effects. In addition, I developed a research program that combined my interest in the field of circadian neurobiology with my current interest in the field of drug-abuse research to investigate the effects of biological rhythms on various aspects of cocaine abuse.

Selected Publications

L. Vidal, J. Blanchard, L. Morin, Hypothalamic and zona incerta neurons expressing hypocretin, but not melanin concentrating hormone, project to the hamster intergeniculate leaflet. Neuroscience. 2005; 134(3):1081-90.

L. Vidal and N. Lugo, Daily profile of neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity and transcript levels in circadian system structures of a diurnal rodent. Brain Res. 2006; 1125(1): 77-84.

L. Vidal and L. Morin, Absence of normal photic integration in the circadian visual system: Response to millisecond light flashes. J Neurosci. 2007; 27(13):3375-82.