Clinical Systems

Fall Semester

Clinical Systems I (7 Credit Hours)

The Clinical Systems I Course is composed of 7 Modules. Lecture videos and PowerPoint presentations will be the main source for delivery of material. Class will correspond with this material and reading assignments. The course will be presented in chronological order as follows:

Module Duration
1 Pediatrics 2 weeks
2 Geriatrics 1 week
Pulmonary  3 weeks 
Cardiology  1 weeks 
Endocrinology  2 weeks 
6 Renal 3 weeks 
7 Gastroenterology (GI) 3 weeks


The Clinical Systems course will provide a foundation for clinical medicine. The course will cover the clinical aspect of medicine relative to the pediatric, adolescent, adult and geriatric population. The first two modules, Pediatrics and Geriatrics, will constitute Life Cycle Medicine. In addition, the course will divide clinical medicine into major organ systems (presented in modules), and will incorporate, (but will not be limited to), Infectious Diseases, Radiology/Diagnostic Imaging, Laboratory Values, and Surgery. At the same time the Clinical Systems Course will have a vertical thread with the Basic Sciences: Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology and Microbiology, so that students will have a complete presentation of each of the disciplines of medicine. The Clinical Systems course will also be integrated with the Primary Care Skills course (case-based learning) and the OSCE course (experiential learning).

Clinical Systems course content will include: etiology, risk factors (genetic, racial, ethnic, environmental), common presenting signs and symptoms, physical examination findings, assessment, appropriate differential diagnosis, ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic and laboratory tests, and current standard of care including: pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, nutrition, preventive medical care, rehabilitation, osteopathic manipulative medicine, and surgical considerations.

While the Clinical Systems course places emphasis on the basic sciences, it includes how common diseases manifest, present, and also differ with regard to gender, age and lifecycle. The course provides the student with knowledge necessary to answer questions based on a clinical scenario and to identify and distinguish common medical conditions, thereby enabling the student to have a greater understanding of proper patient assessment.

In the Pediatrics module, students will learn about human development throughout the life cycle from the first year of life, childhood, adolescence and through adulthood. Students will learn how to assess a pediatric patient from the perspective of a primary care physician, for both a healthy child well-visit and for acute and chronic conditions. Emphasis will be placed on: transition to extrauterine life, common pulmonary and cardiac conditions at birth, developmental milestones, nutrition, gastroenterological and neurologic complications, infectious diseases, and musculoskeletal disorders. General medical and surgical conditions common to the pediatric population will be covered; Pediatrics will also be addressed in subsequent modules. As in all modules, students will be expected to review the relevant Physical Diagnosis lecture and laboratory material from year one.

In the Geriatrics module, students will learn about the heterogeneity of the geriatric population and the unique approach to the geriatric patient. The overall objective is to provide a foundation for geriatrics and to help prepare the students to provide quality health care to older adults. The module will emphasize age-related changes, common chronic conditions, prevalent geriatric syndromes, co-morbidity and how these interact with each other. Students will learn about common medical and nutritional problems for this population and will also have an appreciation of the importance of the social and psychosocial component of the history and its role in deciding treatment options. Students will become familiar with screening tools and learn how to identify dementia, delirium and fall risk. The role of the geriatric team, identifying proper treatment including non-pharmacological therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and other health related professions will be discussed. Geriatrics will also be addressed in subsequent modules.

In each system module, the classic signs and symptoms of common diseases and their clinical relevance as they relate to physical findings are discussed. The diagnostic work up, its importance and limitations are discussed. In addition to appropriate medical management, other therapeutic treatment options (in addition to osteopathic manipulative medicine) and surgical considerations are covered. At the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathophysiology of disease and mechanisms of treatment. Simultaneous instruction in the Primary Care Skills course reinforces the clinical skills necessary for interviewing, examining, diagnosing and treating patients.

The overall goal is to provide a comprehensive presentation of clinical medicine relevant for second year medical students, as well as to help prepare students for clinical rotations. Multiple faculty members will be utilized in their areas of expertise to ensure the best possible exposure for the student.

Spring Semester

Clinical Systems II (7 Credit Hours)

The Clinical Systems II Course is composed of 6 Modules. Video lectures and PowerPoint presentions will be the main source for delivery of material. Class will correspond with this material and reading assignments. The course will be presented in chronological order as follows:

Module Duration
8 Dermatology 1 week
9 Rheumatology/Immulogy 2 weeks
10  Hematology 2 weeks 
11  Oncology 2 weeks 
12  Neuromuscular 4 weeks 
13 Obstetrics/Gynecology 3 weeks 


The Clinical Systems course will provide a foundation for clinical medicine. The course will cover the clinical aspect of medicine relative to the pediatric, adolescent, adult, obstetrics, and geriatric population. In addition, the course will divide clinical medicine into major organ systems (presented in modules), and will incorporate, (but will not be limited to), Infectious Diseases, Radiology/Diagnostic Imaging, Laboratory Values and Surgery. At the same time the Clinical Systems Course will have a vertical thread with the Basic Sciences: Pathology, Pharmacology, Immunology and Microbiology, so that students will have a complete presentation of each of the disciplines of medicine. The Clinical Systems course will also be integrated with the Primary Care Skills course (case-based learning) and the OSCE course (experiential learning). Select topics may be reinforced utilizing Medical Simulation.

Clinical Systems content will include: etiology, risk factors (genetic, racial, ethnic, environmental), presenting signs and symptoms, physical examination findings, assessment, appropriate differential diagnosis, ordering and interpretation of appropriate diagnostic and laboratory testing, and current standard of care including: pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, nutrition, preventive medical care, rehabilitation, osteopathic manipulative medicine, and surgical considerations.

While the Clinical Systems course places emphasis on the basic sciences, it includes how common diseases manifest, present, and also differ with regard to gender, age and lifecycle. The course provides the student with knowledge necessary to answer questions based on a clinical scenario, and to identify and distinguish common medical conditions, thereby enabling the student to have a greater understanding of proper patient assessment.

In the Neuromuscular Medicine module neurological and musculoskeletal conditions will be covered. The HEENT section will emphasize common presenting problems of the head, ear, eye, nose and throat, including symptoms, associated physical findings, differential diagnosis, appropriate laboratory/diagnostic testing and interpretation, etiology, risk factors, treatment, complications, common surgical procedures and trauma. Common emergency medicine topics will also be discussed. Particular attention will be placed on neuro-ophthalmology in the Neuromuscular Medicine Module. This will focus on ophthalmologic manifestations seen in various neurological conditions. As in all modules, students will be expected to review the relevant Physical Diagnosis lecture(s) and lab(s) from year one.

In the OBGYN module gynecological problems including (but not limited to) menstrual disorders, hormonal issues, contraception, infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, common causes of pelvic pain, and screening for gynecological cancer and breast cancer. Obstetrics covers pregnancy and common issues related to the pregnant patient as well as common obstetrics complications. In the OBGYN module students may have an opportunity to assist in a simulated delivery utilizing Medical Simulation.

In each system module, the classic symptoms of specific diseases and their clinical relevance as they relate to physical findings are discussed. The diagnostic work up, its importance and limitations are discussed. In addition to appropriate medical management, other therapeutic treatment options (in addition to osteopathic manipulative medicine) and surgical considerations are covered. At the end of the course students will have a better understanding of the clinical manifestations, pathophysiology of disease, and mechanisms of treatment. Simultaneous instruction in the OSCE course reinforces the clinical skills necessary for interviewing, examining, diagnosing and treating patients.

The overall goal is to provide a comprehensive presentation of clinical medicine relevant for second year medical students, as well as to prepare students for clinical rotations. Multiple faculty members will be utilized in their areas of expertise to ensure the best possible exposure for the student.